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NYUL NYUL HERITAGE TRACKS, LAND AND SEA CONNECTION


All our walking tracks and roads in the Twin Lakes Cultural Park are designed to maintain the old tracks used by Nyul Nyul People. The tracks travel from the sea through to the salt water creeks across the salt marshes and up into the bush eventually reaching the freshwater of the twin lakes.

The land and sea hold the key to a complete diet which the Nyul Nyul people enjoyed all the year round.

“We followed the seasons, seven seasons in all and had many different types of tucker. By eating everything at the right time means there’s a time and a place for everything and everything gets a chance to come back. When it’s time comes it will be there again.” says Bruno“When the season changes we change our diet this is how it’s been going on for tens thousands of years. That’s how our people lived. When our great creator made this earth he put everything there for us. Our old people used to tell us get up do something there’s something out there for you, either you go get it or you leave it!”

said Bruno.

Bruno and I came back bush ten years ago and we were so saddened by the damage bush fires had caused to his country. The last of the Nyul Nyul people forced to leave here was around the late 1950’s. It was so obvious that the land had been very badly neglected. We were so moved by this experience and it was then that we decided to commit ourselves to restoring the area. At the time it seemed like an impossible mission two people facing forests of dead wood. There was an eerie silence in the land that was once abundantly alive, teeming with every kind of wild life. The land was desperate and dying!

Fortunately Bruno had many memories from his boyhood of spending time with his old people his grandfathers, gulloords and his with grandmothers mimi’s and stories they told of country and Nyul Nyul culture.

As a boy he had travelled extensively on the land by donkey for transport or by foot. Bruno remembered the old tracks and campsites. The experience of being there again touched Bruno, and we decided that we had to do something to save his country.

The government had changed their policies about aboriginal people and their land and many were coming back home. Bruno chose this spot Twin Lakes because it was special to his boyhood. He was connected to the camps and places that he loved plus he had the knowledge from this place, Bruno fortunately was back, home!